This is What Happens to Your Body When You Quit Smoking. (It’s Never Too Late To Stop!)

by DailyHealthPost Editorial

quit smoking

1 year after quitting

The excess risk of coronary heart disease is half that of a continuing smoker’s.

(US Surgeon General’s Report, 2010, p. 359)

5 years after quitting

Risk of cancer of the mouth, throat, esophagus, and bladder are cut in half. Cervical cancer risk falls to that of a non-smoker. Stroke risk can fall to that of a non-smoker after 2-5 years.

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(A Report of the Surgeon General: How Tobacco Smoke Causes Disease – The Biology and Behavioral Basis for Smoking-Attributable Disease Fact Sheet, 2010; and Tobacco Control: Reversal of Risk After Quitting Smoking.IARC Handbooks of Cancer Prevention, Vol. 11. 2007, p 341)

10 years after quitting

The risk of dying from lung cancer is about half that of a person who is still smoking. The risk of cancer of the larynx (voice box) and pancreas decreases.

(A Report of the Surgeon General: How Tobacco Smoke Causes Disease – The Biology and Behavioral Basis for Smoking-Attributable Disease Fact Sheet, 2010; and US Surgeon General’s Report, 1990, pp. vi, 155, 165)

15 years after quitting

The risk of coronary heart disease is that of a non-smoker’s.

(Tobacco Control: Reversal of Risk After Quitting SmokingIARC Handbooks of Cancer Prevention, Vol. 11. 2007. p 11)

The Takeaway

Breaking any habit can be difficult. If you want to quit smoking you’ll have to be completely resolute in your new routine, and need to be strong when it matters most – especially when you experience strong cravings, or even if you happen to relapse.

Long-time smokers will battle a stronger addiction than others, but the immediate and long term benefits are more than worth the trouble.

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